Ramona Hattendorf

Aug 132015
 

From the Tacoma News Tribune:

Court fining state government $100,000 per day for failure to fund education

Lawmakers adjourned in July with a budget that put more money toward reducing class sizes in kindergarten through third grade, paying for school materials and operating costs, and expanding all-day kindergarten – each key parts of the McCleary decision.

“But they didn’t come up with a plan for reducing the state’s reliance on local levies to pay for basic education costs, which the court has clearly said are a state responsibility, not a local one.” – Excerpt

The Washington State Supreme Court is fining state government $100,000 per day over the Legislature’s continued failure to pass a plan to fully fund public education.BACKGROUND and RECAP: In its ruling August 13, the state supreme court cites its finding in 2014 that Washington was not on target to meet funding goals that the legislature made for basic education. It ordered the state legislature to submit a plan detailing how it would pay for the expanded program of basic education. When the state failed to do so in 2014, the court held the state in contempt but held off on sanctions until after the legislature convened in 2015.  The court has now issued sanctions.

The $100,000 per day will go to a fund to benefit basic education. The fine will be suspended if the legislature meets in special session.

The governor said he would meet with legislative leaders Monday via conference call.

“There is much that needs to be done before a special session can be called,” he said in a prepared statement. “I will ask lawmakers to do that work as quickly as humanly possible so that they can step up to our constitutional and moral obligations to our children and lift the court sanctions.”

In its ruling, the court called out unresolved capital costs related to full-day kindergarten and smaller class sizes in grades K-3, as well as salaries for teachers and administrators. The state has a salary schedule, but local school districts say they have to supplement it to attract and retain staff. They pay for this through local levies.

  • You can read all the McCleary files here.
  • The Washington Courts press release is here.
  • State Sup. Dorn’s response to the supreme court order is here.
  • Guest opinion from Seattle Senator David Frockt (D-46) is here. (Publicola, “Court Decision clarifies McCleary”)
  • Followup story about next steps is here (Tacoma News Tribune, “Even a big fine is unlikely to uncork logjam on school funding, lawmakers say”)
 August 13, 2015  Posted by on August 13, 2015 Parent Line No Responses »
Aug 032015
 

State to pay for full-day K in 33 Seattle schools

(Big jump from 6, but 38 are still charging tuition)

From the Office of the Superintendentpreschool of Public Instruction (OSPI):

More Students to Receive State-Funded Full-Day Kindergarten

Funding continues to increase and will be available to all schools in the 2016–17 school year

OLYMPIA — August 3, 2015 — A total of 359 additional schools in 139 school districts across the state will begin receiving state funding for full-day kindergarten in the next school year. These new schools increase the total number of schools providing state-funded full-day kindergarten to 847 in 261 districts.

The state Legislature approved the additional funding in its most recent legislative session. These new funds raise the number of kindergarten students eligible to receive funding from 43.75 percent (35,349 students) in the 2014–15 school year to approximately 72 percent (58,833 students) in 2015–16.

“Setting students up with a solid foundation in kindergarten helps them as they move through school,” said State Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn. “State funding of full-day kindergarten is an important part of basic education.”

As the state continues to increase funding for full-day kindergarten, schools with the highest percentage of low-income students are eligible to receive funding first. The number of state-funded full-day kindergarten classrooms is expected to reach 100 percent in 2016–17, a year before the Legislature’s goal of 2017–18.

Six school districts chose not to accept the funding for next school year because they did not have classroom space: Battle Ground, Blaine, Central Valley (Spokane), Mead, Mukilteo, and Pullman.

The additional funding allows schools to increase the number of hours of kindergarten from 450 hours a year to 1,000 hours. When accepting the funding, school districts agree to connect with early learning providers in the area, conduct the Washington Kindergarten Inventory of Developing Skills (WaKIDS) and offer a rich and varied curriculum.

For more information                     

 August 3, 2015  Posted by on August 3, 2015 Parent Line No Responses »
Jul 302015
 

seattle preschool program

 

 

UPDATE 8/4 with link to translated applications
From the Seattle Department of Education and Early Learning:

Seattle Preschool Program (SPP) Applications Due Aug. 10

The deadline to apply to the Seattle Preschool Program (SPP) has been extended to August 10.

 

Applications are also available in 14 other languages on the SPP website at http://www.seattle.gov/preschool.

The first round of selections will occur the week of August 17, and families will be notified of their status by Friday, August 21.

What the is Seattle Preschool Program?

  • The SPP aims to make voluntary, high-quality preschool available and affordable to Seattle’s 3- and 4-year-old children.

Who can apply?

  • All Seattle 4-year-olds.
  • 3-year-olds from low-income Seattle families.
  • Applications are now due August 10, 5 p.m., for preschool classes starting in September.

What does it cost?

  • Free or reduced cost – check website for details

SPP Selected Preschools

DEEL brought together a panel of City staff across departments and community members to select preschools to provide high-quality preschool services for Year 1 of the Seattle Preschool Program. Mayor Ed Murray announced these providers on Monday, July 6.

The providers and their locations are:

Seattle Preschool Providers/Classrooms for 2015-16
Provider Agency # Classes Children
Served
SPP Elementary School Attendance Area(s) of Classrooms
Sound Child Care Solutions – Little Eagles
1000 2nd Ave, Suite 204
2 36 Lowell
Sound Child Care Solutions – Hoa Mai
2915 Rainier Ave S
2 32 Kimball
CDSA – Beacon Hill
2025 14th Ave S
1 20 Beacon Hill
CDSA – Hawthorne
4100 39th Ave S
1 20 Hawthorne
CDSA – Highland Park
1012 SW Trenton
1 20 Highland Park
CDSA – Leschi
135 32nd Ave
1 20 Leschi
CDSA – Maple
4925 Corson Ave S
1 20 Maple
Causey’s – 23rd
527 23rd Ave
1 20 Bailey Gatzert
Causey’s – Orca
2820 S Orcas St
1 20 Dearborn Park
Creative Kids
10525 3rd Ave NW
1 20 Viewlands
TOTAL 12 228

 

SPP Student Enrollment

Here are a few things to keep in mind about SPP Year 1 Student enrollment:

  • There will be only 14 classrooms in Year 1
  • Selected SPP providers are able to “grandfather-in” any children who were already enrolled in their classroom before they were selected to be a SPP provider
  • We anticipate that enrollment for Year 1 will be limited

SPP Enrollment Measures

  • All 4-year-olds in the city (regardless of income level) are eligible to apply
  • Only 3-year-olds who are from households 300% and below of the Federal Poverty Line are eligible to apply
  • Families who live in the greater neighborhood surrounding a selected preschool will be given enrollment priority
  • 4-year-olds will be given enrollment priority over 3-year-olds
  • For more details about SPP enrollment and selection standards, please read pages 26-32 in the SPP Program Plan

 

Kimberly Early
Temporary Community Outreach Manager
City of Seattle Department of Education and Early Learning
http://www.seattle.gov/education

 

 July 30, 2015  Posted by on July 30, 2015 Parent Line No Responses »
Jul 162015
 

From Disability Scoop:

Feds: Most States Failing To Meet Special Ed Obligations

How we’re doing

ChildrenMost children with disabilities in Washington struggle to read at both younger and older ages, and struggle with middle school math. About one out of five will drop out.

Our state was one of 29 that failed to meet the implementation requirements of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Part B, and placed on a “needs assistance” list. Texas and Washington, D.C., were placed on a “needs intervention” list. The remaining 20 states met requirements.

States are assessed annually for both compliance and results, and in Washington, the issue was the latter. Our schools scored 18 out of 20 points on compliance, but only 15 out of 24 on results.

The U.S. Department of Education looked at percentages of students taking regular statewide assessments (as opposed to alternative assessments), results of students taking the National Assessment of Education Progress (NAEP), drop out rates, and percent of students graduating with a regular high school diploma.

On the NAEP,  just 25 percent of 4th-graders and 35 percent of 8th-graders with disabilities scored basic or higher. Younger students with disabilities did better on the math NAEP (59 percent at basic or higher), but faltered in middle school, with just 28 percent scoring basic or above. Results are from 2013.

The federal IDEA guarantees the right to a free and appropriate education to youth with disabilities. Part B covers youth ages 3 to 21; Part C covers birth to age 2.  The disabilities range from visual and speech impairment, to specific learning disorders like dyslexia, to autism and emotional disturbance.

On assessment of IDEA, Part C (babies and toddlers), Washington was one of 23 states to meet requirements.

You can read all the state reports, responses and other materials on the U.S. Department of Education website. Click here for Washington’s IDEA Part B Profile. Materials there that you might find helpful:

Also of note: Low spec ed family engagement

Just 25.8 percent of Washington parents of children receiving special education services reported that schools facilitated parent involvement as a means of improving services and results for children with disabilities.

As a state, Washington does little to support consistent family engagement in either general or special education. Family engagement coordinators are included in the prototypical funding model for basic education, but are only funded at .08 a position to serve a “typical” elementary school of 400. No provision is made for middle or high school.

In Seattle Public Schools, family engagement coordinators aren’t included in the school budgets.

Post-school outcomes for Washington special education students:

  • 23.7 percent enrolled in higher education within one year of leaving high school
  • 52.1 enrolled in higher education or were competitively employed within one year of leaving high school
  • 65.1 enrolled in higher education or in some other post-secondary education or training program, or were competitively employed or in some other employment within one year of leaving high school

Improvement plan highlights

The state is focusing on early literacy skills and has identified five major challenges around special education:

  • Lack of internal compliance controls
  • Inconsistencies in implementation of system-wide interventions
  • Limited use of data-informed decision-making
  • Limited district capacity for identification/selection of evidence-based practices
  • Reliance on traditional stand-and-deliver professional development mechanisms

The state has adopted four “coherent improvement strategies” to support early literacy:

  • Intensive technical assistance
  • Coordinated professional learning
  • Development of a consistency index
  • Parent engagement resources

You can read Washington’s system improvement plan here.

 July 16, 2015  Posted by on July 16, 2015 Parent Line No Responses »
Jul 132015
 

Location, enrollment information for city’s pre-K

From Seattle’s Department of Education and Early Learning:

The Department of Education and Early Learning (DEEL) brought together a panel of city staff across departments and community members to select preschools to provide high-quality preschool services for Year 1 of the Seattle Preschool Program. Mayor Ed Murray announced these providers on Monday, July 6.

The providers and their locations are:

Seattle Preschool Providers/Classrooms for 2015-16
Provider Agency # Classes Children
Served
SPP Elementary School Attendance Area(s) of Classrooms
Sound Child Care Solutions – Little Eagles 2 36 Lowell
Sound Child Care Solutions – Hoa Mai 2 32 Kimball
CDSA – Beacon Hill 1 20 Beacon Hill
CDSA – Hawthorne 1 20 Hawthorne
CDSA – Highland Park 1 20 Highland Park
CDSA – Leschi 1 20 Leschi
CDSA – Maple Park 1 20 Maple
Causey’s – 23rd 1 20 Bailey Gatzert
Causey’s – Orca 1 20 Dearborn Park
Creative Kids 1 20 Viewlands
TOTAL 12 228

Additionally, Department of Education and Early Learning utilized resources from the Families and Education Levy to create a pathway for preschool providers who do not currently meet the Seattle Preschool Program requirements to get funding, improve quality, and work toward joining the Seattle Preschool Program. These Pathway programs will be announced soon.

Seattle Preschool Program Student Enrollment

Here at the Department of Education and Early Learning (DEEL) we are gearing up to begin enrolling students into our selected Seattle Preschool Program (SPP) classrooms. Enrollment is opening now as Mayor Murray announced the providers for the first year of the program.

Here are a few things to keep in mind about SPP Year 1 Student enrollment:

  • There will be only 14 classrooms in Year 1
  • Selected SPP providers are able to “grandfather-in” any children who were already enrolled in their classroom before they were selected to be a SPP provider
  • We anticipate that enrollment for Year 1 will be limited

SPP Enrollment:

  • All 4-year-olds in the city (regardless of income level) are eligible to apply
  • Only 3-year-olds who are from households 300% and below of the Federal Poverty Line are eligible to apply
  • Families who live in the greater neighborhood surrounding a selected preschool will be given enrollment priority
  • 4-year-olds will be given enrollment priority over 3-year-olds
  • For more details about SPP enrollment and selection standards, please read pages 26-32 in the SPP Program Plan

You can access the SPP application form here.

For more information about applying for SPP, contact the Department of Education and Early Learning at preschool@seattle.gov or call (206) 684-3942

http://www.seattle.gov/education/child-care-and-preschool/seattle-preschool-program

 July 13, 2015  Posted by on July 13, 2015 Parent Line No Responses »
Jul 092015
 
A Better Way:

Two opportunities – lunch and evening – to learn how Oakland schools cut suspensions by about half

Shared by Laura James (part of the CPPS team):

Rethinking School Discipline with the Oakland Unified School District

Learn how the Oakland Unified School District (OUSD) has reduced school suspensions by 47 percent and is working to eliminate racial disparity.

Friday July 17, 2015 – Two Events:

  • 11:30 am – 1 pm Lunch and Learn Session – Bertha Knight Landes Room, Seattle City Hall, 600 4th Avenue – Bring your lunch and join Seattle City Councilmember Bruce Harrell, Chair of the Seattle City Council Public Safety, Civil Rights, and Technology Committee for a special presentation from OUSD representatives. Everyone welcome. Water and juices will be provided.
  • 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm Community Session – South Shore PK-8 School, 4800 S. Henderson, Seattle – Join fellow community members, parents, educators, and officials in an interactive learning session with OUSD representatives to learn about their efforts and their outcomes in reducing suspensions and eliminating racial disparity. Everyone welcome. Food will be provided at 5:30; program will begin at 6pm.

Approach: In 2010, OUSD began an integrated 4-pronged approach to reducing discipline and eliminating racial disproportionality. They have achieved significant outcomes, including a 47% decrease in suspensions. The four evidence-based components of their approach are:

  • Restorative Justice
  • Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS)
  • Trauma-Informed Care (TIC)
  • Culturally Relevant Instruction

OUSD Representatives:

  • Theresa Clincy – Coordinator of Attendance and Discipline
  • Antonio Fregoso – Sergeant, Oakland School Police
  • Barbara McClung – Director, Behavioral Health Initiatives
  • Emilio Ortega – Manhood Development Instructor and Restorative Justice Coordinator

Sponsors: City of Seattle, King County, University of Washington School of Social Work – Communities in Action, Seattle Public Schools’ African American Male Scholar Think Tank, Rainier Beach Action Coalition, Community Center for Education Results-The Road Map Project

Background: In 2010, OUSD began an integrated 4-pronged approach to reducing discipline and eliminating racial disproportionality. They have achieved significant outcomes, including a 47 percent decrease in suspensions. The four evidence-based components of their approach are:

  • Restorative Justice – See this Sept 2014 report on OUSD’s Restorative Justice program and outcomes
  • Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS) – OUSD’s PBIS consultant is Seattle-based Dr. Lori Lynass; see her video here:  Also see PBIS website and resources.
  • Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) – See TIC website
  • Culturally Relevant Instruction – See this video of Christopher Chatmon, director of OUSD’s African American Male Achievement Office.  Also see this January 2015 report on OUSD’s Manhood Development Program: The Black Sonrise.
 July 9, 2015  Posted by on July 9, 2015 Parent Line No Responses »
Jul 072015
 

What’s working, what should gap accountability group know about?

From the Educational Opportunity Gap Oversight and Accountability Committee:
Community forum July 21, 3-5 pm, at Highline College
We’d like to know!
  • What are some of the existing or emerging issues in education?
  • What are some ideas or recommendations for strengthening our education system?
  • What’s working?
  • What’s happening in the community that you’re excited about?
  • For school and district staff or community groups, what would you be willing to do to help close the opportunity
The Educational Opportunity Gap Oversight and Accountability Committee (EOGOAC) is hosting a community forum event and would like to invite all interested parents, students, community members, and education related organizations to join in discussion about closing the opportunity gaps for Washington’s kids. Flyer and parking pass are attached.

Tuesday – July 21, 2015
3:00 p.m. – 5:00 pm
Mt. Constance/Mt. Olympus room
Highline College, Building 8
2400 S. 240th St., Des Moines, WA 98198

 July 7, 2015  Posted by on July 7, 2015 Parent Line No Responses »
Jul 022015
 

So far, Washington’s performance is better than anticipated

Washington students who took the Smarter Balanced tests are generally scoring higher than last year’s field tests indicated they would, according to preliminary results released today by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).” – Excerpt

Note: These preliminary results do not include opt outs. Click through above for charts, more detail.

 

 July 2, 2015  Posted by on July 2, 2015 Parent Line No Responses »
Jun 302015
 

Achievement, opportunity gaps on state board of education’s July agenda

Separate Seattle community forum July 8 at the Rainier Community Center

sbe photo

The State Board of Education is hosting its July 7-9 meeting in Seattle at the Museum of Flight. This is an excellent opportunity to learn about the board and the work it does to support all Washington State students.

The board sets state graduation requirements and oversees the state’s achievement and accountability system. You can learn more, here.

As part of their visit, the board will be hosting a community forum July 8, from 6-7:30 pm, at the Rainier Community Center, 4600 38th Ave. S, Seattle, WA 98118. Topics include strategies for closing the achievement gap, standards, and assessment. You can register here.

Complete July 7-9 agenda

Complete board packet

There will be time for public comment on Wednesday, July 8, at 2:45 pm and Thursday, July 9, at 11:45 am.

Our agenda is full of items directly impacting kids, and focuses on achievement and opportunity gaps experienced across our system. … We will also hear from a panel of school district personnel on the challenges they’ve encountered during the transition to the SBAC assessment tool.” – Excerpt (letter from Executive Director Ben Rarick)

 June 30, 2015  Posted by on June 30, 2015 Parent Line No Responses »